the egyptology reading room the egyptology reading room   the egyptology reading room the egyptology reading room the egyptology reading room the egyptology reading room the egyptology reading room

31 July 2010

In the egyptology reading room, 2010, a copy of Jacques Derrida’s Of Grammatology locates in The Egyptology Reading Room of the Sterling Memorial Library at Yale University in New Haven, CT.  These photos do not speak just for themselves.  This is not an exercise to define the discipline of photography: to create a new discipline for photography.  I am also not trying to document something in order to prove its existence.  I am trying to imagine ways for proposing thought of the impossibility of imagining itself.  I am trying to imagine ways for thinking of things as if what were to happen is always already happening.   I am thus making work about the thinking of the time that is absent from the image.  I am making work about the dissemination of images.

Dissemination is the spreading of seeds, the distribution of sensibility according to the absence of a law of meaning.  the egyptology reading room is about the absence of the narrative of how these sensibilities inscribed themselves.  It is also about the narrative of how these sensibilities are inscribed.  We must then assume these things were only as if already happening. 

The phenomenology of the subject inscribed in the work such as the egyptology reading room is one that becomes accepted at the price of becoming Law, marking the impossibility of politics in the absence of dissemination.  Dissemination thus marks the impossibility of Law from assuming a totality of politics by showing the inequality of experience between the subjects of the self and other.  The dissemination of images prevents Law from becoming the totality of politics, thereby allowing us to recognize the (im)possibility of the other in the face of Law.

I have written about deconstruction since the egyptology reading room at once attempts to improperly and strategically arrange things to alter what subjects might think possible in the impossibility of such an event.  In the 1970s Jacques Derrida taught at Yale as part of what became known as the Yale School of deconstruction.   Harold Bloom, Geoffrey  H. Hartman, Paul De Mann,  and Joseph Hillis Miller, Jr. affiliated with the school.  The placement of Of Grammatology in The Egyptian Reading Room shows two seemingly contradictory narratives: a copy of Jacques Derrida’s Of Grammatology in The Egyptology Reading Room, a room that emphasizes the exploits of the Western imperialism to give a sense of mastery to the university system. 

the egyptology reading room
2010
dimensions variable
             
link-stephen garrett dewyer

 

 

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